Mingle

19 Mar 2022 - 08 May 2022

Rachel de Joode is well-known for mixing mediums, particularly those of photography, sculpture and most recently, painting. Her work bounces between the physical and the virtual, exploring the relationship between the three-dimensional object and its two dimensional-representation. De Joode’s work is a constant play between surface, representation and materiality.

For a series that premieres in her first solo exhibition at Dürst Britt & Mayhew, De Joode mounted prints on wooden panels – not only on the front, but also on he sides, mimicking the effect of a very flat canvas. Subsequently she made thick marks on the works by means of paint strokes that are applied in a frivolous way. This playfulness has been accentuated by using bright, cheerful bubble-gum-like colours. Several of these work are presented in a salon hanging, as if performing in a cheerful choir.

De Joode (1979, The Netherlands) earned her diploma in time-based art from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. She was awarded the Deutsche Börse Residency Program at the Frankfurter Kunstverein in Frankfurt (2013) and the Sculpture Space funded residency (2012), as well as a residency at LMCC swingspace program at Governors Island (2013 – 2014) in New York.

Her work has been included and reviewed in Vitamin C: Clay and Ceramics (Phaidon), ArtforumArtnetThe New York TimesThe New YorkerDIS magazine and Charlotte Cotton’s book Photography is Magic.

De Joode’s work has been exhibited at Centre Photographique, Marseille (2021); Annka Kultys Gallery, London (2020); The Pitcairn Museum of Contemporary Art, Groningen (2020); Göteborg International Biennial for Contemporary Art (2019); Galerie Christophe Gaillard, Paris (2018); ZKM, Karlsruhe (2017); ICA, Philadelphia (2017); Kunstfort Vijfhuizen (2017); Kunstverein Nürnberg (2016); Dürst Britt & Mayhew, The Hague (2016); MACRO Contemporary Art Museum of Rome, Rome, (2015); Bergen Kunsthall (2012).

Work by de Joode is held in various private and public collections, including the Collection of Keramiek Museum Princessehof, Leeuwarden and the collection of the Amsterdam UMC.

Rachel de Joode would like to thank the Mondriaan Fund for their kind support and the Amsterdam UMC for kindly loaning a work from their collection.

 

Essay

Click to read a specially commissioned interview by Joost Bergman

 

Reviews and features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


 
Frontspace: Orca

19 Mar 2022 - 08 May 2022

For her exhibition ‘Orca’ Maja Klaassens brings together a body of work consisting of painting, sculpture and installation. All works testify of the ephemeral nature of memory and the human desire to collect, record and store our memories.

Klaassens explores the way we isolate, edit, re-arrange, and save images and objects. These fragments (more easily than the whole) become props in semi-fictional or metafictional texts we ‘write’ in our own mind, as a response to experience and reality.

Her interest in writing as a kind of automatic internal mechanism reveals itself within the works in the show. Klaassens’ ‘grass’ paintings have been executed as if writing, concentrated at a desk, rose thorns on branches can be read like words on a line, and strips cut from a photograph of an orca fin are readable as both individual lines encased in glass, and a whole image.

Thorns and an orca fin can act as both a fragment and a pars pro toto, as what is missing continues to exist as a kind of ghost. To Klaassens, this is the same as how experiences remain as ghosts behind the fragments we extract from them and form into memories. 

A black fin on a black reflective dinner table turns the surface of the table into the surface of the ocean, and resembling a large screen (the ultimate memory-storage), the table becomes the bottomless pit of the interface. The impression is uncanny, and encourages the viewer to fixate on the details of real and fabricated elements within one work.

The similar shape of the thorn and the fin emphasises the way threats and protection can occur together. Klaassens tries to find ways to show how recording memory can be both pleasant and anxious: leaving us questioning the missing parts of what happened in the grass, or at the dinner table.

Maja Klaassens (1989, New Zealand) obtained her BFA from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague in 2014, and her MA in Contemporary Art History from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in 2021. Recent group exhibitions include ‘After Daan van Golden’ at Parts Project and ‘RSVP’ at Billytown. In 2019 her work was shown at Poppositions in Brussels and she co-curated the group exhibition ‘Hinkypunk’ at Billytown. In 2020 she was awarded the Stroom PRO Research Grant. 

 

Essay

Click here to read a specially commissioned text by Danica Pinteric


 
Orienting Around

04 Dec 2021 - 06 Mar 2022

’Orienting Around’ brings together the work of Yeşim Akdeniz and Marwan Bassiouni. Both artists have their roots in Islamic and Arab cultures; Akdeniz was born in Turkey and Bassiouni’s father had the Egyptian nationality. Both countries belong to the so called “Orient,” a designation for countries in the near and far east about which Europeans have long held very stereotypical ideas. Even though Akdeniz and Bassiouni have a contrasting focus in their practice and their work has different visual manifestations, the works in this exhibition nevertheless intersect in various surprising ways.

Yeşim Akdeniz‘ work is concerned with Orientalism, gender and queer studies as well as cultural appropriation. Her work is infused with symbolic narratives that can be read as signs of cultural production, negotiation and appropriation. While she was primarily focused on painting, her most recent work consists of textile assemblages titled ‘selfportrait as an orientalist carpet’. These works combine autobiographical elements with (art)-historical narratives that position questions on identity formation along with ascriptions and self-attributions of objects as representations of political structures.

Yeşim Akdeniz (Turkey, 1978) studied at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf (1998-2002) and at de Ateliers in Amsterdam (2002-2004). In 2005 she won the Peter Mertes Stipendium of the Bonner Kunstverein. Her work has been exhibited in institutions such as Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, Kunstverein Frankfurt, MAK Museum Vienna and Sammlung Philara in Düsseldorf. Her work is held in private and public collections, including Deutsche Bank Collection, Sammlung Philara, Nederlandsche Bank Collection, Fries Museum and Achmea Collection. In 2017 Yeşim Akdeniz was appointed as professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. She lives and works in Brussels and Düsseldorf.

Marwan Bassiouni’s detailed photographs question how Islam is represented in the West, and show a society in which several cultures exist alongside and with each other. For his series ‘New Dutch Views’ he travelled through polders, along industrial estates, to villages, inner cities and suburbs to photograph the Dutch landscape from the windows of mosques. In the photos we see interiors, combined with the actual view that can be seen from the mosque. The works show the diversity of Islam in apparent contrast to the equally diverse and at the same time unmistakably Dutch landscape.

Marwan Bassiouni (Switzerland, 1985) holds a BA in photography from The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and a photographer CFC from the Photography School of Vevey (CEPV). In 2019 he had a solo exhibition at The Hague Museum of Photography and published the book ‘New Dutch Views’. His work has been exhibited at Bienne Festival of Photography (CH), Photobastei /VFG prize, Zürich (CH), Sharjah Art Foundation (UAE), Circulation(s), Paris (FR), Fotomuseum Winterthur (CH), Aperture (USA), Paris Photo (FR), Athens Photo Festival (GR). A work from his ‘New Dutch Views’ series is currently  included in the ‘Gallery of Honour of Dutch Photography’ at the Nederlands Fotomuseum in Rotterdam.

Work by Bassiouni is held in private and public collections, including the International Centre for Photography in New York, Kunstmuseum Bern, Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam, Kunstmuseum Den Haag, Fenix Museum of Migration, Rotterdam, AEGON Art Collection, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Amsterdam UMC. Bassiouni is the recipient of amongst others the W. Eugene Smith Student Grant, the Harry Pennings Prize, and the Prix Circulation(s)-Fujifilm. Bassiouni lives and works in Amsterdam.

 

Essay

Reviews and features

NRC by Lucette ter Borg

Den Haag Centraal by Eline van der Haak

Villa Next Door 2 by Albertus Pieters

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


 
Frontspace: TK 15223

04 Dec 2021 - 06 Mar 2022

Ultramarine blue is recognized as one of the most eminent colors in the history of painting. Although it has been widely available since 1826 due to the discovery of synthetic ultramarine, its specific color experience has long been inextricably linked to the rare and precious lapis lazuli stone from Sar-e-Sang. These mines in what is now called Afghanistan have been supplying the highest quality stone to an extensive trading network for over 6,000 years.

Pieter Paul Pothoven realized the work Consignor Consignee (2021) from lapis lazuli that he acquired in Kabul in 2009. The stones were shipped by the Dutch Embassy through Kamp Holland (ISAF) in Tarin Kowt, Uruzgan, to the naval base in Amsterdam. By grinding and separating the lapis lazuli based on the density and specific mass of lazurite, the mineral that gives the rock its sought after colour, the resulting pigments represent varying intensities of the very same material—from the precious ultramarine the Old Masters have worked with, to the grey-blue dust left behind in the mine shafts.

Like the stones, also the crate, in which they were transported, were reworked into supports for the different pigments. By processing, repackaging and shipping lapis lazuli anew as a series of artworks, Pothoven underlines the post-aesthetic condition of the pigments. More than just an immaterial colour experience with a range of meanings – the color of peace, virtue, the sacred, the infinite and the void – the variegated ultramarine blue of Consignor Consignee is also a carrier of pressing contexts. The dust which miners have been breathing in for thousands of years; foreign intervention in the country where the stone is mined; the Amsterdam shipyard, now a naval base, where VOC ships were once built: all these frameworks testify to an asymmetric distribution of labour, power and wealth, from which the arts too cannot escape.

Pieter Paul Pothoven’s practice consists of installation, photography and different forms of writing. Historiography in relation to material culture pervades all projects and connects them in both theoretical and visceral ways. He received his BFA at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and his MFA at Parsons The New School for Design, New York (US). He was a resident at, amongst others, Instituto Sacatar, Itaparica (BR), Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA (US) and the Jan van Eyck, Maastricht (NL). Recent exhibitions include: In the Presence of Absence, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (NL); No you won’t be naming no buildings after me, TENT, Rotterdam, (NL); History is His Story, Nest, The Hague (NL); facade suspended, Dürst Britt & Mayhew, The Hague (NL); You Talkin’ to me?, Barbara Seiler, Zürich (CH); Listen to the Stones, think like a mountain, Tatjana Pieters, Ghent (BE); Lapis Lazuli from Serr-i-Sang, PuntWG, Amsterdam (NL); 11:59, Hudson D. Walker gallery, Provincetown (US); The Intelligence of Things, The Kitchen, New York (US). Work by Pothoven is held in private and public collections, including the Fries Museum, Leeuwarden, Akzo Nobel Art Foundation, Amsterdam and the Van Lanschot Art Collection, The Hague. Pieter Paul Pothoven lives and works in Amsterdam.

This work has been made possible with the generous support of the Mondriaan Fund and the Faculty of Science, Geology and Geochemistry (VU University, Amsterdam), with a special thanks to Roel van Elsas.

 
Essay

Reviews and features

Villa Next Door 2 by Albertus Pieters

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


 
Envision this is part XXXVII of an ensemble that is no longer necessarily ceremonial

04 Oct 2021 - 14 Nov 2021
For a period of five weeks Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to host Networked Collective.

Networked Collective is a non-permanent group of about twenty five artists, actors, theoreticians and performers that collectively produce works, films and plays.

The main protagonist of this show is a printing press on which all the works will be produced. Every work will have multiple ‘authors’. These works have a pluriform potential; they can function autonomously, but they may also be transformed into garments, and from time to time they will be activated by performers.

The collective has been initiated by Bas van den Hurk and Jochem van Laarhoven and has been active in various places. This is the first time however that they work within the context of a ‘commercial gallery’. During this project the space of the gallery can be seen as a studio to work and experiment in, as an assembly line, as a stage for performance, a ‘zone of sentience’, a sewing workshop, an educational space, a white cube, or a hang-out.

Visitors can see the collective ‘at work’ during opening hours in the main space of the gallery. In the Frontspace there will be a continuously changing presentation of the works produced. The selection of these works will not only be made by the gallerists, but also by guest curators.

Stemming from self-organized structures Networked Collective creates a rhizomatic rampant growth in which potentialities and impotentialities – notions that come from Giorgio Agamben – both play a role.

Participants
Matea Bakula, Rob van Kranenburg, Reinout Scholten van Aschat, Matthijs van de Sande Bakhuyzen, Sofie Hollander, Felix Kindermann, Samieh Shahcheraghi, Marijn van Kreij, Piet Dirkx, Xuan Hu, Sanne Jansen, Marisa Goedhart, Liza Wolters, Arash Fakhim, Mike Suijkerbuijk, Benjamin Schoones, Alexander Mayhew, Jaring Dürst Britt, Chrys Amaya Michailidis, Isabel Cordeiro, Jamie Kane, Bo Stokkermans, Loran van de Wier, Mathilde Nobel, Lotte Driessen, Gijsje Heemskerk, Daniele Formica, Urs Moore, Fatemeh Heidari, Fatima Beker, Berendine Venemans, Andela Vidic, Katerina Sidorova and others.

Guest curators
Zeynep Kubat, Xuan Hu, Alicia Kremser and others.

Guest writer
Jeroen van der Hulst

Special Programme on Sundays
Sunday 17 October: Jam session with Mathilde Nobel, Benjamin Schoones, Samieh Shahcheraghi, Lotte Driessen, Bo Stokkermans, Jochem van Laarhoven, Bas van den Hurk and others.

Sunday 31 October: Dinner performed by Loran van de Wier and others.

Sunday 14 November: text reading with Alexander Mayhew, Reinout Scholten van Aschat, Matthijs van de Sande Bakhuyzen, Lotte Driessen, Chrys Amaya Michailidis and others.

NB: these activities will take place during the whole day. Keep an eye on our social media accounts for more information. During normal opening hours you are also welcome to visit the gallery.

 
What the moon can tell you has been said by the sun

17 Jul 2021 - 05 Sep 2021

‘What the moon can tell you has been said by the sun’ presents the work of Willem Hussem (1900-1974) alongside that of three female artists: the Dutch Esther Tielemans (1976), the Mexican Alejandra Venegas (1986) and the South Korean Jongsuk Yoon (1965).

Willem Hussem was active as a painter, sculptor and poet and is considered one of the most important abstract working Dutch artists after the Second World War. Since Dürst Britt & Mayhew took over the representation of Hussem’s estate two years ago, we have increasingly been placing his work in a contemporary context and in an international perspective. Hussem was always fascinated by Asian cultures and Pre-Columbian art and the influence of this is clearly perceptible in his work.

At the same time, Hussem is an artist who will today be referred to by some as the prototype of the “old white male artist”. With this exhibition, we want to show that such (dis)qualifications are irrelevant on a purely visual level; the similarities between the works of Hussem and the other artists – regardless of age, gender and cultural origin – can be called remarkable. All four painters attempt, in their own way, to capture nature and the landscape by means of abstract forms. It is furthermore interesting that each of the three female artists not only comes from a different continent, but is also in a different phase of her life.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘Different Eyes’, a specially commissioned essay by Joke de Wolf.

 

Reviews and features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


 
Plankenkoorts

16 Apr 2021 - 11 Jul 2021

Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to present ‘Plankenkoorts’, Jacqueline de Jong‘s third exhibition at the gallery.

The exhibition focuses on works from the 1990s and specifically on works made on sailcloth and panel. Working on sailcloth started with a commission for a branch of the Nederlandse Bank in Drachten in Friesland in 1992. De Jong was fascinated by the many shipyards in the area, where skûtsjes were built and thus she came across various discarded pieces of sailcloth. For the bank she made a partition in the middle of the office between the cashiers and the main lobby in the form of a sailcloth painted on both sides. This work ‘The Backside of Existence’ will be on view in De Jong’s upcoming retrospective at WIELS in Brussels, opening on the 1st of May.

The commission started a further series of works on sailcloth. The monumental installation ‘Hanging Women’ is included in the exhibition at Dürst Britt & Mayhew. This piece of painted unstretched cloth serves as a theatrical staging for a series of other paintings on sailcloth and board, depicting various road accidents. Both the work ‘Hanging Women’ and the car crash paintings are reminiscent of de Jong’s ‘Accidental’ and ‘Suicidal’ paintings from the 1960s. Despair and chaos are never far away and the works are a stark reminder of our current feverish times, in which we have to fight our monsters and try to find our feet again.

A series of small Indian ink drawings mounted on panel from 1973 and two large drawings from 1996 complete the exhibition, with their restless and hallucinatory imagery. They show De Jong’s continuous agility to stage her haunting protagonists, be they humans or monsters, in diverse formats and materials.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘The back(side) of painting’, a specially commissioned conversation by Anna Gritz, curator and writer at KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin

 

Reviews and features

Den Haag Centraal by Eline van der Haak

Art Viewer by Federico Acal

Villa Next Door 2 by Albertus Pieters

chmkoome’s blog by Kees Koomen


 
Gläserner Mensch

28 Nov 2020 - 28 Mar 2021

‘Gläserner Mensch’ brings together a body of new works by Dutch artist Wieske Wester and Russian artist Katerina Sidorova. Both artists share a fascination for the manipulative powers of government and the value of resistance and protest. The title of the exhibition refers to the German term for a fully screened, monitored person, and is used as a metaphor for the unbridled collection of personal data from private persons. 

For her new series of large scale paintings Wieske Wester found inspiration in George Orwell’s dystopian books and essays. Instead of directly referencing for example the role of certain animals in Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’, in which, once in power, they suppress and exploit other animals, she searched for their vulnerability. In that sense her works can be considered portraits that do not necessarily look like the portrayed, but offer an ambiguity, layers of interpretation, characteristics that have to be discovered slowly by ‘reading’ between the lines. 

Katerina Sidorova was struck by a video ad published on Youtube by the Kalashnikov military factory promoting ‘The Wall’, a truck-based device designed to stop massive demonstrations. Produced and presented with extreme levels of masculinity, aggression and obscene pride, the ad is meant to showcase the newest technological progress in Russia and deter potential protesters. For this exhibition Sidorova has recreated elements of riot control arms and oppressive architecture, but made out of a fragile material like glass, thus underlining notions of false transparency.

Wieske Wester (1985, NL) obtained her BFA from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, after which she was selected for a two-year residency at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. In 2015 she graduated from the HISK in Ghent. Her work has been shown internationally at various venues such as White Crypt in London and the 6th Moscow Biennale for Art. Recent projects include group exhibitions at Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, the Gorcums Museum in Gorinchem, and CODA Museum in Apeldoorn. Wester’s work is held in private and public collections, including LAM in Lisse, Rabobank Collection, Ahold collection, and the Moraes Barbosa collection in Brazil. In 2020 she was awarded the Mondriaan Fund’s Stipendium for Established Artists.

Katerina Sidorova (1991, RU) obtained a BFA from both the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, and Yaroslavl State Pedagogical University, Russia after which she traveled to the Glasgow School of Art for a Master in Fine Arts. Recent group exhibitions include ‘Escape Room’ at Stroom, The Hague, ‘MeetingGrounds’ at Onomatopee, Eindhoven, ’Migrating Textile, Save the Loom’ at Nieuw Dakota, Amsterdam and ‘In Poland, David Bowie was a woman’ at Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven. Sidorova published various artist’s books of which the most recent is ‘Potato Planters’. In 2020 she was awarded the Mondriaan Fund’s Stipendium for Emerging Artists. She is currently a PhD student at the Philosophy department of Yaroslavl State Pedagogical University.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘A fictional conversation on surveilled bodies made out of fragments from recorded conversations’, a specially commissioned text by Adrian Bridget.

 

Reviews and features

NRC by Thomas van Huut

Villa Next Door by Albertus Pieters

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


 
Frontspace: Augensex

28 Nov 2020 - 28 Mar 2021

After David Roth‘s recent successful solo presentation at Vienna Contemporary Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to present ‘Augensex’, an intimate presentation in the Frontspace.

David Roth’s artistic practice forms a long-term research into the origins, processes and manifestations of painting. For Roth the process of making and the element of chance involved are as important to notice as the final visual outcome. Therefore a so called end product as for example a painted canvas and side products as for example a palette or a piece of cloth for cleaning brushes, have the same value for him. Every surface with marks and history of the process may turn up in his works.

Time and duration are important elements and the layering of materials from different periods within one work can either spark dissonance or renewal. Roth’s works continually play with concepts of construction and deconstruction as well as with the performative and sculptural potential painting can possess.

‘Augensex’ displays a concise variety of works: a selection of recently finished small-sized paintings that have been created over a period of six to ten years; two watercolours on paper from the series ‘Action Paintings’; and a so called ‘Combine Painting’, which consist of one stretched and one unstretched canvas hung together.

David Roth (1985) graduated from the Academy of fine arts Vienna in the class of Daniel Richter. Recent solo and duo exhibitions include ‘An introduction to painting’ at Dürst Britt & Mayhew,  ‘remember’ at New Jörg in Vienna, ‘Vogl/Roth’ at Skulpturinstitut in Vienna, ‘ça grésille, ça clignotte’ at le commissariat in Paris and ‘Orgy Now’ at Ve.sch in Vienna. Recent group exhibitions include ‘Stretch Release’ at Dürst Britt & Mayhew, ‘Vielfalt’ at Landesmuseum Burgenland, ‘Imago Mundi’ at Belvedere Winterpalais in Vienna and ‘Plus jamais seul’ at Standards in Rennes. Work by Roth is held in private and public collections including the Landesmuseum Burgenland, the AkzoNobel Art Foundation, the Aksenov Family Foundation and the Luciano Benetton collection. David Roth lives and works in Vienna, Austria.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘A conversation about painting’, a specially commissioned interview by Jip Hinten.


 
Frequently the woods are pink

11 Sep 2020 - 15 Nov 2020

‘Frequently the woods are pink’ brings together a body of new works by Dutch artist Paul Beumer and Mexican artist Alejandra Venegas. Both artists share a fascination for nature and landscape, which in this case results in works made from tree bark and wood. The title of the exhibition comes from a poem by Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), which relates how the landscape changes with the seasons.

During a recent residency in Sarawak, on the island of Borneo, Paul Beumer got acquainted with textiles made out of the inner bark of specific native trees. The use of bark is one of the oldest techniques for creating textiles and predates weaving. By soaking the bark in water and pounding it with wooden tools the fibres soften and expand. This laborious process produces a stunning ochre coloured material, called barkcloth, which is held in high spiritual regard, but is also used for more common means, such as loincloths. The technique is practiced in Africa, Asia and Micronesia and from 2008 has been inscribed on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

For his new series of works Beumer managed to obtain various sorts of barkcloth from an Iban tribe member in Sarawak. In his studio in Kuching he started to experiment with the material to see if he could slightly change the colour. He thereto employed a mixture of lemon juice and hydrogen peroxide, which enabled him to make bleached strips on the material. Subsequently he stitched together various pieces of the cloth to form abstract compositions. To even further the contrast between organic material and abstract presentation he eventually decided to encase the cloth in rectangular single colour frames. The chosen colours are referencing the colours of the sky: from a grey day to a deep blue night to a pink sunrise. 

Alejandra Venegas is a contemporary painter who recently started to use an unusual surface to paint on, namely carved wood. She hand carves landscape scenes from various sorts of wood native to Mexico, after which she colours them with gouache and wax. Uniting the natural, warm tones of the wood with stridently bright shades is a contrast she actively seeks for. Incorporating the natural irregularities of the wood makes it much more than just a panel to paint on and gives the work a definite sculptural character. She very much enjoys the artisanal and durational processes involved in the wood carving. For Venegas these works have therefore become a meeting place between painting, sculpture and drawing.

In the same vein as Paul Beumer, Venegas’ interest lies in an intercultural search for motifs, patterns and symbols, which seem to have a universal meaning. Since her childhood, through her artist parents, she has focused her gaze on Asian art, Japanese woodblock prints, Tibetan Buddhist painting, traditional African woodcarving and Egyptian hieroglyphs among many other interests. Her imagery stems from her memories and from closely observing her immediate natural surroundings, being her garden and the mountain close to her house, as well as various other territories. Her works hover between the figurative and the abstract, the real and the surreal. They have firm roots in Mexico, but they speak of a shared human experience and language.

After having shown in the Frontspace of the gallery in 2019 and being newly represented by Dürst Britt & Mayhew, ‘Frequently the woods are pink’ is Alejandra Venegas’ first major exhibition outside of Mexico. For Paul Beumer this exhibition is his third in the gallery and shows an important step in his ongoing intercultural research on textile traditions and putting these traditions into dialogue with both his own and Venegas’ contemporary painterly background.

 

Essay

Click to read a specially commissioned text by Paul Beumer and Alejandra Venegas.

 

Reviews and features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal

Villa Next Door by Albertus Pieters

Lost Painters by Niek Hendrix


 
Frontspace: Prayer Rug Selfies

11 Sep 2020 - 15 Nov 2020

During his art academy studies, Marwan Bassiouni began to carry a thin prayer rug along with him wherever he would go. He wanted to perform his five daily prayers on time. Therefore, throughout the day, no matter where he would be he would search for a quiet and empty space to attend to his daily act of worship. One afternoon, after finishing his prayers, instead of eagerly rushing back to his daily routine, he stopped and looked back at his prayer rug laying on the floor within an empty class room. For a moment it felt like he had stepped outside of time, space and himself. This simple piece of material seemed to have become the trace of an encounter between his faith and his every day environment, which are inseparable yet often separated or divided even within his own mind. And so, he made a photograph, the first prayer rug selfie.

‘Prayer Rug Selfies’ is an ongoing longterm project that now counts over 130 photographs. It is Bassiouni’s diary of an awareness of being in a certain place at a certain moment in time. Every photograph is the result of a need to pray and not an intention to make a photograph. Every location is chosen according to its suitability for a prayer to be performed and its proximity within Bassiouni’s daily environment. The picture is taken after the prayer is finished.

For his solo exhibition ‘Prayer Rug Selfies’ at Dürst Britt & Mayhew Bassiouni made a selection of images from the months of March, May and June 2020. A time characterized by the severe implications of the Corona virus, Bassiouni found himself praying outdoors more than indoors. It makes for a series of intimate and tranquil images, which are connected by an act of remembrance, humility and gratitude.

Marwan Bassiouni (1985) is a Swiss, Egyptian, American photographer. He holds a BA in photography from The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and a photographer CFC from the Photography School of Vevey (CEPV). In 2019, he had a solo exhibition at The Hague Museum of Photography and published the photo book ‘New Dutch Views’, which was nominated for the Swiss Design Awards. His work has recently been exhibited at Aperture (USA), Fotomuseum Winterthur (CH), Athens Photo Festival (GR), The Humanity House (NL), Festival Circulation(s) (FR), Kunsthal Helmond (NL), Cultuurhuis De Warande (BE), and Paris Photo (FR). Marwan is the recipient of the W. Eugene Smith Student Grant, the Harry Pennings Prize, the Prix Circulation(s)-Fujifilm, and several other awards and nominations.

Work by Bassiouni is held in private and public collections, including Kunstmuseum Den Haag, The Hague, NL, International Center of Photography, New York, US, Menzis Art Collection, NL, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, NL and Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs and Integration, NL.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘Elegant rebellion’, a specially commissioned essay by Kim Knoppers

 

Reviews and features

Financieel Dagblad by Jeroen Bos

Villa La Repubblica by Albertus Pieters

Villa Next Door by Albertus Pieters

De Kunstmeisjes by Renee Schuiten- Kniepstra

Pf Fotografie magazine

Initiatives of Change by Tracie Mooneyham

Frieze by Kadish Morris

The Guardian by Beth Dean

Metropolis M by Domeniek Ruyters

Mister Motley by Lieneke Hulshof

De Volkskrant by Karolien Knols

Het Parool by Edo Dijksterhuis


 
Vèf Jaah!

14 Feb 2020 - 16 Aug 2020

On 14 February 2015 Jaring Dürst Britt and Alexander Mayhew opened the doors of their gallery in The Hague with the group exhibition ‘Urbi et Orbi’, showing fourteen promising young artists who all graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague.

14 February 2020 marked Dürst Britt & Mayhew’s fifth anniversary. The group exhibition ‘Vèf Jaah!’ shows works by all of our thirteen represented artists, as well as a selection of handouts that have been created by graphic designer Chantal Hendriksen since the beginning of the gallery in 2015.

From each of our artists we show one work that has never been shown in the gallery before accompanied by a work that was sold in the past few years and has an interesting story to the sale.

These stories have been recorded by art critic Bertus Pieters and printed on the by now well-known handout, thus giving a concise history of the gallery up to now.

 

Essay

Click to read ‘The Art of the Gallery’, a specially commissioned essay by Bertus Pieters.

 

Reviews and features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal

chmkoome’s blog by Kees Koomen

Tableau magazine by Marjolein Sponselee

Jegens en Tevens by Vincent ‘t Sas

Villa Next Door 2 by Bertus Pieters


 
Verweile doch! Du bist so schön!

16 Nov 2019 - 26 Jan 2020

Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to present “Verweile doch! Du bist so schön!”, Sybren Renema’s second solo exhibition at the gallery. Renema is interested in all forms of human knowledge-production, with a particular liking for art, history, geographical exploration and the natural sciences. His work is often concerned with narratives of exploration, the sublime landscape and the validity of Romantic clichés in the 21st century. His practice manifests itself in the form of videos, collages, neon-installations, digital prints and sculptures.

“Verweile doch! Du bist so schön!” starts from a fascination for the figure of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), the Weimar-based writer, statesman and scientist. In his time Goethe reached the status of a cultural superstar with the novel “The Sorrows of Young Werther” and the drama “Faust”. Key-pieces in Renema’s exhibition are a neon-installation based on Goethe’s (pseudo-scientific) Theory of Colours and a fountain that Renema composed of ceramic casts from Goethe’s life mask. Various of the works in the exhibition are the result of recent residencies at the European Ceramic Workcentre (ekwc) in Oisterwijk and BANFF Centre for Arts in Canada.

Sybren Renema (1988) is active as a writer, musician and artist. After receiving his BFA from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, he became the youngest MFA student to ever enroll at the Glasgow School of Art. Recent solo exhibitions include “The Burden of the Incommunicable” at FIU | Miami Beach Urban Studios, “Lift off, land Ahoy” at LETO gallery in Warsaw and “Relics” at the Glasgow Project Room. Recent group exhibitions include “Nightfall” at Musée Rath in Geneva, “Palinsestri” at Sharevolution in Genoa, “Im Taumel der Nacht” at Deli Projects in Basel and “Out of Khentii” at the Union of Mongolian Artists in Chingis City. Work by Renema is held in private and public collections, including the Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, the AMC Collection in Amsterdam, the Fundación Proyecto Bachué in Bogota and the art collection of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 2017 his work was shown in the Antarctic Pavilion as part of the Venice Biennial.

 

Essay

Click to read ’27 Minutes with Sybren Renema’, a specially commissioned essay by Ranti Tjan

 

Reviews and features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal

Villa La Repubblica by Bertus Pieters

Jegens & Tevens by Vincent ‘t Sas

chmkoome’s blog by Kees Koomen

De Kunstmeisjes by Mirjam Kooiman


 
Frontspace: Timicho

16 Nov 2019 - 26 Jan 2020

In the Frontspace Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to present Timicho, an exhibition by Mexican artist Alejandra Venegas.

Venegas’ work bears witness to an intense relationship with landscape, a contemporary dissolution of the barriers between culture and nature, figurative and abstract representation. Based in the mountains on the outskirts of Mexico City, Venegas establishes a dialogue with the traditional Chinese painting style Shan sui, that literally means ‘mountain’ and ‘water’, through an intuitive and spontaneous practice, imbued with the dynamism and bright palette of Mexican modern art. Intense colour and simple geometry: rivers and mountains, waterfalls and creeks, clouds and planets create serene and vivacious landscapes. Working with gouache and wax on carved native woods like ahuehuete, ciricote, huanacaxtle Venegas’ works in this exhibition delicately hover on the boundaries between drawing, painting and sculpture.

Alejandra Venegas Geffroy (1986, Mexico City) studied Visual and Plastic Arts at La Esmeralda in Mexico City. Recent solo exhibitions include “Cavar estanques y amontonar montañas” at Casa Santa Maria de Fundación Casa Wabi. Recent group exhibitions include “Luego, la forma” at Galeria GAM in Mexico City, “Quality Time” at Proxyco Gallery in New York, “Fuera de los muros entre los cuerpo” at Casa de la Cultura San Rafael in Mexico City, ”Courage! Near infra red” curated by Abraham Cruzvillegas at Galeria Rinomina in Paris and “Hacer una isla” with BWSMX at Ruberta in Los Angeles. In 2018 Venegas was a resident artist at Casa Wabi in Oaxaca. In 2014 she was selected for the XVI Biennial Rufino Tamayo and in 2016 for the Biennial UNAM of Visual Arts. In 2013 and 2015 she received the FONCA Jóvenes Creadores scholarship.

 

Essay

Click to read a specially commissioned interview by Madelon van Schie

 

Reviews and features

Villa Next Door by Bertus Pieters

Art Viewer by Federico Acal


  |  Artist's Website
 
An introduction to painting

07 Sep 2019 - 20 Oct 2019

Dürst Britt & Mayhew is proud to present Austrian artist David Roth‘s first solo exhibition at the gallery, which opens on Saturday 7 September between 5 and 8pm.

David Roth’s artistic practice forms a long-term research into the origins, processes and manifestations of painting. For Roth the process of making and the element of chance involved are as important to notice as the final visual outcome. Therefore a so called end product as for example a painted canvas and side products as for example a palette or a piece of cloth for cleaning brushes, have the same value for him. Every surface with marks and history of the process may turn up in his works.

Time and duration are important elements and the layering of materials from different periods within one work can either spark dissonance or renewal. Roth’s works continually play with concepts of construction and deconstruction as well as with the performative and sculptural potential painting can possess. This becomes very clear in a series of works called ‘Brain’, which seem to behave like sculptures, but nevertheless have all the trappings of a painting: a bearer (be it a canvas or pieces of cloth), colour, and even a wooden framework. The trestles which are supporting the loose painted textiles are in fact made of modificated stretcher bars.

David Roth (1985) graduated from the Academy of fine arts Vienna in the class of Daniel Richter. Recent solo and duo exhibitions include ‘remember’ at New Jörg in Vienna, ‘Vogl/Roth’ at Skulpturinstitut in Vienna, ‘ça grésille, ça clignotte’ at le commissariat in Paris and ‘Orgy Now’ at Ve.sch in Vienna. Recent group exhibitions include ‘Stretch Release’ at Dürst Britt & Mayhew, ‘Vielfalt’ at Landesmuseum Burgenland, ‘Imago Mundi’ at Belvedere Winterpalais in Vienna and ‘Plus jamais seul’ at Standards in Rennes. Work by Roth is held in private and public collections including the Landesmuseum Burgenland and the Luciano Benetton collection.

 

Reviews & Features

Art Viewer by Federico Acal

Villa La Repubblica by Bertus Pieters

Jegens en Tevens